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Tech Educators/Navigators (10 positions statewide) | UMD

The University of Maryland Extension is hiring! They are looking for Tech Educators/Navigators (10 positions statewide)

Chartered as the Maryland Agricultural College on March 6, 1856, the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources is the cornerstone of the University of Maryland system, built upon a foundation of sound science, groundbreaking research through the Agricultural Experiment Station, and Maryland pride. The University of Maryland College of Agriculture and Natural Resources (AGNR) is a leading Land-Grant institution providing teaching, research, and programs through the University of Maryland Extension (UME) to a diverse clientele in the State of Maryland and beyond.
Within the UME Family and Consumer Science Program, the Tech Extension project addresses the digital divide and increases broadband adoption through digital literacy and navigation programs in Maryland. The Tech Extension Educator will work in digital literacy education, outreach, and digital navigation programs in their respective city/county/cluster.

These educators/navigators will develop partnerships with local agencies, educational institutions, non-profit organizations, faith-based groups, workforce agencies, for-profit industry, and others in the respective city/cluster. Tech Extension Educator/Navigator will;
(1) assist community residents with digital inclusion information and resources on affordable broadband access, appropriate device, and digital skills,
(2) provide educational programs and information to increase digital literacy skills,
(3) provide basic technical support to enhance digital access and inclusion in Maryland.

Digital literacy teaching can be conducted in-person, hybrid, or virtually (group or individual classes). Navigation assistance can be provided in-person, telephone, video-chat, email, text, and other communication methods that work for the learner.

Interested? Apply on the University of Maryland ejobs website: https://ejobs.umd.edu/postings/99785