Improve Your Landscape Performance

<div class="at-above-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://mygreenmontgomery.org/project/improve-your-landscape-performance/"></div>Keep you garden and family healthy by using fewer fertilizers and pesticides.<!-- AddThis Advanced Settings above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Advanced Settings generic via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons above via filter on get_the_excerpt --><!-- AddThis Share Buttons below via filter on get_the_excerpt --><div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://mygreenmontgomery.org/project/improve-your-landscape-performance/"></div><!-- AddThis Share Buttons generic via filter on get_the_excerpt -->

Do the natural thing!

The grounds and gardens around our home are our oasis and a personal reflection of our regard for our environment. How we use and care for them has a significant environmental impact. Proper, sustainable maintenance techniques and planting lower-maintenance plants can reduce inputs needed, and that’s always better for the environment. With low-maintenance, high-performance landscaping, you’ll save time, conserve our natural resources, and still get great looking results. Here are some general guidelines:
  • Use native plants: They’ve adapted to the local climate, need little organic input, are more pest-resistant, and often are more drought-tolerant than introduced varieties. Many are also important food and shelter sources for beneficial insects like butterflies and honeybees, as well as birds and other wildlife.
  • Compost your trimmings: Grass clippings, leaves, twigs, branches — along with kitchen scraps — yield nutrient-rich compost that’s highly beneficial for your lawn and garden.
  • Avoid pesticides: Many organic methods of pest control are effective; use pesticides only as a last resort.
  • Test before fertilizing: Too much can lead to contamination and cause harmful algal blooms in local waterways and the Chesapeake Bay. Use sparingly, and choose slow-release and/or organic products whenever possible.

2 comments

Has anybody tried organic pesticides? Do they work?

Yes, I’ve had good experiences with them on my tomatoes. Like all gardening you still have to know what you are treating.