grants

The Muddy Branch Alliance helps keep our waters clean – and wants to get you outside to enjoy them

The Muddy Branch Alliance helps keep our waters clean – and wants to get you outside to enjoy them
Did you know that the Muddy Branch stream runs for more than 12 miles, from Gaithersburg High School all the way to the Potomac – and that almost 11 of those miles have a natural surface trail for walking, hiking, or riding alongside?

The Muddy Branch Alliance, or MBA for short, is a local non-profit that protects and improves the water quality and natural habitat of the Muddy Branch stream for the benefit of the community. To achieve this goal, they bring neighbors and community groups together to maintain and improve the trail, and keep the stream clean. Most weekends you can find MBA members along the trail with local Scout groups, churches and other volunteers removing invasive plants, planting trees, doing trail work, or cleaning up trash.

  Muddy Branch Alliance

  The MBA knows that people care about what they know, and regularly hosts events along the stream and trail.  On October 13th, the MBA will be partnering with local organizations to host a volksmarch on the Muddy Branch Trail.  A volksmarch is an organized hike intended for everyone to enjoy at their own pace while also appreciating the scenic views around them. All are welcome and encouraged to come out and enjoy this family-friendly event.  The event is free and open to all with donations accepted at the start and finish.

Monarch butterflyTo help improve water quality in the stream the MBA recently launched the Lands Green Waters Clean program which helps homeowners reduce runoff from their yards, driveways, and houses. Homeowners can take simple steps reduce the amount of pesticides, fertilizers, and pet waste that enter our waterways. Conservation landscaping removes small areas of turf grass, which does not effectively absorb water during heavy rains, and replaces it with more permeable soil and native plants, shrubs, and trees. This protects water quality, improves habitat for birds and fish, and makes streams safer for families.

These projects make yards and common spaces beautiful, encourage native birds and butterflies, and can qualify homeowners for a rebate on their property taxes.  For homeowners interested in being a part of the initiative, a trained professional is sent to their homes to survey their yards to help design an eco-friendly oasis. The MBA will also help connect the property owner with resources and grants to help cover the costs.

Small actions within the community can have a significant impact on the Muddy Branch Watershed. By making small changes, our community can work together to keep our watershed healthy.

  Muddy Branch Alliance

  For more information on the Muddy Branch Alliance visit their website or visit their Facebook page. Interested in becoming a part of the Lands Green Waters Clean initiative to create your own backyard oasis? Click here for more info. Want to RSVP for the Volksmarch and secure a t-shirt? Click here.

The Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach Grant Program is now OPEN!

The Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach Grant Program is now OPEN!
The Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach Grant program, offered by the Montgomery County Government and the Chesapeake Bay Trust, is now accepting proposals to support watershed restoration and outreach throughout Montgomery County.

The Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach Grant Program encourages small-scale on-the-ground restoration practices like rain gardens and permeable pavement to reduce stormwater runoff and pollutants through community-based restoration. Equally, outreach and stewardship activities engaging Montgomery County residents in the restoration and protection of the local rivers and streams of Montgomery County are highly encouraged.

This funding opportunity is made possible through the County’s Water Quality Protection Charge and is available for projects throughout Montgomery County for grant awards of up to $100,000. The Trust welcomes applicants from 501©3 non-profit organizations such as community associations, faith-based organizations, youth, and civic groups, watershed organizations, and others. Nonprofits and communities with property in common ownership are strongly encouraged to apply. More information is available by visiting the Chesapeake Bay Trust website.

Deadline: September 27th, 2018 at 4pm

For questions contact Grant Manager: Jeffrey Popp, 410-974-2941, ext. 103

Please note that the municipalities of Gaithersburg, Rockville, and Takoma Park are not eligible for funding in this program; however they are eligible in a separate Outreach and Restoration Grant Program that is also open now with the Trust.

On-site ESD Stormwater Management

Montgomery County stormwater summit for homeowners

Montgomery County stormwater summit for homeowners
On June 6 the Environmental Finance Center (EFC) at the University of Maryland (UMD) hosted a Montgomery County Stormwater Summit for Homeowners at Brookside Gardens in Wheaton. This event, part of larger project funded by a Chesapeake Bay Trust grant and the Montgomery County Water Quality Charge, was attended by more than 70 folks from all across the County.

Staff from the EFC’s Sustainable Maryland program presented information about a variety of rebate and incentive programs offered by Montgomery County. A particular focus was on the RainScapes program, which offers rebates on best management practices such as rain gardens, rain barrels and cisterns, pervious pavers, and conservation landscaping.

  Brandy Espinola EFC Speaking

  Additional information was presented about the Tree Montgomery program (free trees), pet waste management, litter control programs, and organic lawn care.

Local government agencies and regional watershed associations that staffed exhibit tables at this event included the County Department of Environmental Protection, Rock Creek Conservancy, Little Falls Watershed Alliance, and the Muddy Branch Alliance, each of which explained the unique support and technical services that they provide to towns and neighborhoods in the County.

  DEP Literature Table

  Next steps in this project will include EFC staff working specifically with the Wheaton Hills Civic Association, Glenmont Forest Neighbors Civic Association, and McKenney Hills-Carroll Knolls Civic Association to provide residents with information about the County’s stormwater-related programs, as well as providing these communities with basic watershed assessments that will identify and prioritize issues and potential future projects.

For more information, please contact Mike Hunninghake, Program Manager, Environmental Finance Center-UMD, at mikeh75@umd.edu or 301-405-7956.

 
Sarah Morse Little Falls Watershed Speaking

Sarah Morse Little Falls Watershed Speaking

Local nonprofit organizations receive close to $300,000 in grants for environmental projects

Local nonprofit organizations receive close to $300,000 in grants for environmental projects
The Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection and the Chesapeake Bay Trust announced that $291,000 in grant funding has been awarded to seven organizations to improve water quality and help manage stormwater runoff in Montgomery County. Neighborhood groups, faith-based organizations, and nonprofit organizations received support ranging from $6,000 to $77,000.

“The Department of Environmental Protection is committed to improving the water quality of our local streams while contributing to the health and sustainability of our communities,” said Patty Bubar, acting Director of the Department of Environmental Protection. “This grant program fills an important niche towards meeting our mission and we’re thrilled to be able to support and engage these hard-working local groups who share this mission.”

Established in 2014, the initiative supports projects and programs that improve communities and water quality in Montgomery County through public engagement, education, and on-the-ground restoration projects.

Project types include public outreach and stewardship projects, such as volunteer-led stream cleanups, stormwater education workshops, environmental education projects and community-based restoration projects, such as rain gardens, rain barrels, tree planting, impervious pavement removal, conservation landscaping, and green roofs.

Funding for these projects is made possible through the County’s Water Quality Protection Charge.  The Chesapeake Bay Trust, a regional grant-maker specializing in engagement of not-for-profit entities in restoration and outreach work, administers the grants for Montgomery County, similar to programs it manages for seven other jurisdictions.

These programs are so important to provide residents and nonprofit groups the tools, resources, and power to be part of the solution and feel like they are improving their communities,” said Jana Davis, executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust.  “Completing one’s first project as a nonprofit creates the capacity to do so much more and we’re proud of how many of these groups have grown and become strong grantees in other programs.”

The 2018 Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach Grant Program awardees include:

Anacostia Riverkeeper, $14,644: To engage Montgomery County Spanish-speaking populations in programs to improve water quality.

Anacostia Riverkeeper, $58,350: For rain gardens and conservation landscape plantings at the Sandy Spring Friends Meeting House.

Audubon Naturalist Society of the Central Atlantic States, Inc., $53,417: For a rain garden at Woodend Nature Sanctuary in Chevy Chase.

Butler Montessori, $58,275: To remove 3,000 square feet of impervious surface and install permeable pavers at Butler Montessori School in Darnestown.

Friends of Sligo Creek, $22,650: For an engineering study, conservation landscaping, dry wells, and engagement of volunteers in the Three Oaks community in Silver Spring.

University of Maryland, Environmental Finance Center, $77,096: To engage county Civic Associations in watershed restoration activities and to hold a stormwater summit in Montgomery County.

Wildlife Habitat Council, $6,568: To engage corporations in the implementation of stormwater and habitat best management practices such as rain gardens, bioretention cells, conservation landscaping, water recapture, and other practices on corporation-owned land.

 

About the Chesapeake Bay Trust

The Chesapeake Bay Trust (www.cbtrust.org) is a nonprofit grant-making organization established by the Maryland General Assembly dedicated to improving the natural resources of Maryland and the Chesapeake region through environmental education, community engagement, and local watershed restoration. The Trust’s grantees engage hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in projects that have a measurable impact on the waterways and other natural resources of the region. The Trust is supported by the sale of the Treasure the Chesapeake license plate, donations to the Chesapeake Bay and Endangered Species Fund on the Maryland State income tax form, donations from individuals and corporations, and partnerships with private foundations and federal, state, and local governments such as Montgomery County. The Trust has received the highest rating from Charity Navigator for fourteen years: 92 percent of the Trust’s expenditures are directed to its restoration and education programs.

 

About Montgomery County’s Department of Environmental Protection

The mission of the Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection is to enhance the quality of life in our community by protecting and improving Montgomery County’s air, water, and land in a sustainable way while fostering smart growth, a thriving economy, and healthy communities.

Investing in our community: A look at the first year of watershed grants

Investing in our community: A look at the first year of watershed grants
In 2016, the Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection, in partnership with the Chesapeake Bay Trust, awarded $350,000 in grants to community groups and nonprofit organizations working to improve our local water quality.

The goal of the grants program is promote initiatives and projects that improve water quality in Montgomery County’s local streams and waterways through public engagement, education, and on-the-ground restoration.

 
Kids School

Glenville kids green club mural and conservation landscape



  During the first grant cycle, 13 projects were funded ranging from $10,000 to $51,000.  The grantees and their partners also contributed $140,000 in matching funds, further expanding the impact of the projects.

 

Diane Cameron, Audubon National Society, providing a homeowner workshop on stormwater control



The Funded Projects:

  • Montgomery County Watershed Stewards Academy
  • Watershed and Stormwater Management Education Videos
  • Public Outreach and Stewardship and Community-Based Restoration Implementation at Sandy Spring Friends School
  • Trees for Sacred Places Montgomery County


 
Restoration Project

Earth Steward Volunteers planting a conservation landscape at Pleasant View Historic site along Darnestown Rd



 
  • Enhancing the Green on Greenery Lane Demonstration Project
  • Public Outreach and Stewardship on Sacred Grounds: Engaging the Faith-Based Community of Montgomery County in Watershed Management
  • Community-Based Restoration Implementation: Churches to increase cistern and rain garden ripples through Montgomery County
  • Public Outreach and Stewardship- Rock Creek Park In Your Backyard
  • Expanding the Water WatchDog Program in the Sligo Creek Watershed


 
Construction Project

Construction of a rain garden at Silver Spring United Methodist church



 
  • Neighbor to Neighbor (N2N) public outreach, stewardship and community-based restoration
  • Public Outreach and Stewardship Project for the Cabin John Creek Watershed
  • Stakeholder Engagement with Montgomery Housing Partnership
  • Creating a Watershed Restoration Public Demonstration Center at Woodend Nature Sanctuary


 
Student engagement project

Victor Bennett prepping students from Sandy Springs Friends School before construction of their rain garden



Accomplishments of the Awarded Grants:

  • Volunteer efforts: 16,661 hrs donated from 880 volunteers, equaling $443,849.04 in service hour labor to the community
  • Total treatment of 2.23 acres of impervious surface.
  • 2,243 workshop attendees from the 53 community workshops held
  • 409 Trees planted
  • Installed 8,478 sq. ft of conservation landscaping and 650 sf of rain gardens including 1,660 native plants
  • Removal of 250 sq ft of Impervious surface
  • 15,185 gallons of rain water consistently captured through 13 cisterns and 45 rain barrels installed by grantees and their partners such as the Boy Scouts of America.
  • Grantees were able to work with 26 communities and 78 faith based organizations directly resulting in 21 additional RainScapes applications and more than 100 stormwater site assessments.
  • Production of 3 educational videos on stormwater pollution and increased website and social media traffic to the organizations respective websites.


 
Volunteer installing down spout on a rain barrel

Member of the Potomac chapter of the Boy Scouts of America working with the Friends of Cabin John watershed group to fit a rain barrel on a home.

Grant opportunity: Funding for community watershed restoration and outreach projects

Grant opportunity: Funding for community watershed restoration and outreach projects
The Montgomery County Government and the Chesapeake Bay Trust announce a grant program to support watershed restoration and outreach projects throughout Montgomery County. The goal of this program is promote initiatives and projects that improve water quality in Montgomery County’s local streams and waterways through public engagement, education, and on-the-ground restoration. What this funds: The Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach Grant Program funds public outreach and stewardship projects, community-based restoration water quality implementation projects. Projects should educate and engage residents in watershed improvement while achieving measurable impacts and sustainable behavior change. Creative and innovative proposals are encouraged. Together, these efforts will restore and protect the local rivers and streams of Montgomery County. For more information, see the RFP. Who can apply: Any 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization such as local watershed groups, community associations, service and civic groups, faith-based organizations, and more. See the RFP for the full list or organizations. How much can be awarded: Up to $100,000 with larger awards possible with prior approval from the Trust. Implementation project location: Montgomery County, Maryland outside the municipalities of Rockville, Gaithersburg, and Takoma Park. See the Trust’s Outreach and Education grant program for projects in these areas. Is match required? Match is encouraged but is not required. Preference will be given to projects with match and/or in-kind services. Deadline: October 5, 2017 at 5:00pm View the RFP. How to Apply?: Apply through the Chesapeake Bay Trust website.    

Over $1 million announced to support stream restoration and stormwater management research

Over $1 million announced to support stream restoration and stormwater management research
The Chesapeake Bay Trust, in partnership with the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the Maryland Department of Transportation’s State Highway Administration, Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection (Montgomery DEP), and with input from the Maryland Department of the Environment, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and other agency and technical partners on the Restoration Research Advisory Committee, announce six recipients of the collaborative Restoration Research Award Program.

Efforts to restore the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries call for a significant increase in the number of watershed restoration projects intended to improve both water quality and habitat. Questions about the performance and function of some of these practices persist in the regulatory community as well as the restoration practitioner community. Answering these questions will ultimately lead to increased confidence in outcomes of restoration projects, identification of cheaper ways and better places to build projects, and information useful to regulatory agencies in project permitting.

“The health of Chesapeake Bay depends on the quality of the water flowing from the streams and tributaries in our backyards and communities,” said Mark Belton, secretary of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. “This program will provide more in-depth scientific data and measurable results to help local stream restoration activities and efforts that seek to mitigate the amount of sediment and nutrients entering our waterways.”

In the third year of this award program, two new funding partners have been added to the program: MDOT SHA and Montgomery DEP. Additional partners are expected in future years.

Montgomery County is required to treat thousands of acres of impervious surface as part of its Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) permit. “We want to employ the most cost-effective approaches to retrofitting impervious surfaces,” said Lisa Feldt, Director of the Montgomery County DEP. “We take our responsibility with public dollars and our responsibility to improve waterways in our communities very seriously, and improving our understanding of how practices such as urban trees treat stormwater will help us maximize outcomes.”

 
Image of a restored stream bank.

Lower Booze Creek stream restoration



   

Recent projects funded in the Restoration Research Award Program include:

  • South River Federation, $199,990 for “Assessing Watershed-scale Restoration Effectiveness: Treatment Impacts and Monitoring Requirements” The South River Federation and Smithsonian Environmental Research Center will evaluate the cumulative performance of multiple Best Management Practices (BMPs) at a subwatershed scale. The research team will compare watershed-level discharges of sediment and nutrient pollutants from seven interconnected, restored subwatersheds of Church Creek.
  • Center for Watershed Protection, Inc., $200,000 for “Using a Novel Research Framework to Assess Water Quality Impacts of Urban Trees” This research team will quantify the stormwater treatment value of trees across urban forest types. The project will identify urban forest characteristics that influence the water and ecosystems and determine whether more complex urban forest types result in greater runoff volume reduction.
  • University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science (UMCES), $199,314 for “Long-term impacts of living shorelines to Sub Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) habitats in the Chesapeake Bay” This project will assess the long-term performance of living shorelines, a practice of using natural shoreline habitat to prevent erosion rather than hard shoreline armor, as well as their potential impacts to adjacent seagrass beds.
  • University of Maryland College Park, $198,332 for “Tree Trade-Offs in Stream Restoration Projects: Impact on Riparian Groundwater Quality” Predicting the impact of tree removal associated with stream restoration on riparian water quality remains a challenge. This project will quantify the effects of riparian deforestation on groundwater quality across urban restored, degraded, and forested reference sites.
  • Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, $217,322, “Improving the Success of Stream Restoration Practices” This project will improve our understanding of the conditions under which stream restoration practices “fail,” with the long term goal of improving the overall application, design, and review of stream restoration projects. Information from this study will provide guidance on factors that indicate the risk of project failure, such as watershed size or impervious land use or channel specific stream power or relative floodplain width.
  • Versar, Inc., $180,408 for “An Evaluation of Forest Impacts as Compared to Benefits Associated with Stream Restoration” The goal of this project is to better understand the impacts of stream restoration on forest resources. The research team will inventory trees, understory vegetation, and reptiles and amphibians to determine whether there are any potentially negative impacts as a result of positive stream restoration practices.


   

Chesapeake Bay Trust logoAbout the Chesapeake Bay Trust

The Chesapeake Bay Trust is a nonprofit grant-making organization established by the Maryland General Assembly dedicated to improving the natural resources of Maryland and the Chesapeake region through environmental education, community engagement, and local watershed restoration. The Trust’s grantees engage hundreds of thousands of individuals annually in projects that have a measurable impact on the waterways and other natural resources of the region.

The Chesapeake Bay Trust, established by the State of Maryland to serve a convening and collaborating grant-making role, manages the awards made through the partnership and ensures that what is learned is translated back to the regulatory and practitioner communities.

“At the Chesapeake Bay Trust, we want to invest our resources in watershed restoration projects that are placed in the best spots, can be done as quickly and cost-effectively as possible, and are the best at their goals of improving water quality and habitat,” said Jana Davis, executive director of the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “We are still learning a lot about what works and what doesn’t, and we want to share what we learn with those similarly responsible for getting projects in the ground.”

DEP is hiring! Join our team as the Program Manager of Partnership Development

DEP is hiring! Join our team as the Program Manager of Partnership Development
The Montgomery County Department of Environmental Protection is hiring for a new position that will oversee our partnership development.  For those interested, the application deadline is April 13!  

Program Manager, Partnership Development (Grade 23) Montgomery County Government Department of Environmental Protection Rockville, Maryland Requisition Number: IRC24654 Salary Range: $56,669 – $93,863

  This position will be part of the Office of Sustainability in the Division of Environmental Policy & Compliance in the Department of Environmental Protection. As a member of the Office of Sustainability, this position will work within a team of environmental professionals focused on providing information and programs related to a broad range of sustainability topics to residents and businesses in Montgomery County. This position focuses on developing partnerships to support DEP’s programs related to a wide range of environmental topics, including energy efficiency and renewable energy, tree and forest protection and enhancement, waste reduction and pollution prevention, sustainable business practices, and other sustainability topics. The selected individual will develop direct relationships with residential organizations, business groups, non-profit entities, and others to identify partners in the development, delivery, and utilization of DEP’s sustainability-related activities. The successful candidate must excellent interpersonal and communication skills, and the ability to work in a collaborative environment within a large organization with multiple priorities. Key responsibilities include:
  1. Identifying appropriate audiences to target for potential partnership opportunities, focusing on both partners that can help DEP deliver programs (including grant providers) and those that utilize DEP’s programs and services.
  2. Communicating in-person or electronically with the identified partners to understand their capabilities and/or needs.
  3. Working with other outreach staff and technical program managers to (a) utilize the potential support the partner can provide or (b) tailor program offerings or outreach and education materials to address the needs of the partner.
Candidates must have experience communicating to, and fostering partnerships, with groups and organizations of different types. Experience in environmental programs and a passion for environmental issues, while not a requirement, is a plus. Candidates must have excellent oral, written, and presentation-based communication experience, including the ability to present complex and technical concepts to a general audience. This position requires the ability to attend meetings or perform work at locations outside the office, including some evenings and weekends. The preferred criteria for this position:
  1. Experience developing and implementing partnership development activities. Experience in the environmental arena a plus.
  2. Experience collaborating with technical program staff to tailor messages to diverse audiences.
  3. Experience providing oral communication (such as giving presentations and/or speaking to the public, business owners, partner organizations) and written communications (such as reports, memos/letters, proposals, etc.) to convey complex and technical concepts to a general audience.
  4. Knowledge of the grant application and management process.
 

We offer competitive salaries and excellent benefits.

To view the complete job posting and submit an application, please visit www.montgomerycountymd.gov/careers and then click on “Apply Now”.  On the next page, click the Search Jobs tab and then enter the Requisition Number IRC24654 into the Keywords field.

This Recruitment Closes April 13, 2017

Share this posting

All resume submissions must address the preferred criteria for the Partnership Development Program Manager position, which are listed in the full advertisement, preferably in a separate section of the resume. Applicants are strongly encouraged to review the Resume Tips and FAQs on the Office of Human Resource’s Careers webpage for important information about the County’s application requirements and process.

EOE. M/F/H

Watershed restoration and outreach grants open to community groups

Watershed restoration and outreach grants open to community groups
The Montgomery County Government and the Chesapeake Bay Trust announce a new grant program to support watershed restoration and outreach projects throughout Montgomery County. The goal of this program is promote initiatives and projects that improve water quality in Montgomery County’s local streams and waterways through public engagement, education, and on-the-ground restoration.  

What’s Funded?:

The Montgomery County Watershed Restoration and Outreach Grant Program funds public outreach, stewardship projects and community-based restoration water quality implementation projects. Projects should educate and engage residents in watershed improvement while achieving measurable impacts. Creative and innovative proposals are encouraged. Together, these efforts will restore and protect the local rivers and streams of Montgomery County. For more information, see the RFP.   For more on the grant program and application process, what is funded and examples of past funded projects, attend the information session:  

Who Can Apply:

Non-profit organizations such as local watershed groups, community associations, service and civic groups, faith-based organizations, and more. See the RFP for a full list of eligible organizations.  

How Much can be Awarded:

Up to $100,000 with larger awards possible with prior approval from the Trust.  

Implementation Project Locations:

Montgomery County, Maryland outside the municipalities of Rockville, Gaithersburg, and Takoma Park. (For projects in these jurisdictions visit the Chesapeake Bay Trust’s Outreach and Education grant program) Is match required? Match is encouraged but is not required. Preference will be given to projects with match and/or in-kind services.   Deadline: October 6, 2016 at 5:00pm  

Grant Application Process

The Chesapeake Bay Trust’s grant applications are all submitted through an online system. If you have questions regarding the application process, please contact this program’s grant manager, Jeffrey Popp at (410) 974-2941 ext. 103. *Please note: The Trust’s grant system works best in Internet Explorer, especially when uploading documents.* Grant Info Website Apply Now!

Questions?

If you have a potential project or a question the eligibility of a project, contact the Chesapeake Bay Trust Grant Manager at Jeffrey Popp at (410) 974-2941 ext. 103